John Carroll -
The First Roman Catholic Bishop in the United States

 

By Michael Doyle
In Irelands Own, No. 4826

John Carroll (1735-1815) was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on August 5th 1735. Carroll was the son of an important Maryland family with Irish connections [his family were from south Offaly]

Due to the fact that there were no schools for the training of priests in the American colonies, he was sent to Europe for his education. He went first of all to St. Omer in France, became a Jesuit in 1753, studied at Liege, Belgium and was ordained in 1769. Fr. Carroll then taught in Flanders for four years, was chaplain to Lord Arundel in England before returning to Maryland in 1774 just before the onset of the American fight for freedom.

One of the first things Fr. Carroll did when he returned was to build a mission church at hist mother's house in Rock Creek which served the Catholic population of the area and of nearby Virginia. Fr. Carroll did not take an active part in the American fight for independence, although at the request of the Continental Congress, he took part in a diplomatic mission to Canada where an unsuccessful attempt was made to secure help, or neutrality, of French Canadian catholics. On this mission, John Carroll met the great Benjamin Franklin, a future President of the United States.

In 1783, John Carroll and a number of priests came together and appealed to Rome for permission to continue their mission work and to work under a superior chosen from among them. This led to John Carroll's appointment as superior of the mission of the thirteen States, with the power to confirm. During 1784 he wrote "An Address to the Roman Catholics of the United States of North America" which was a reply to the anti-Catholic views of a certain Charles Wharton. His pamphlet was the first work published by an American Catholic in the United States.

Archbishop John CarrollFr. Carroll took up residence in Baltimore and became a popular figure, head of the Library Company and of the trustees of Baltimore College, and a trustee of St. John's College, Annapolis. In 1789, he was appointed the first American Bishop and the first See was established in Baltimore. In the year of 1781, Bishop Carroll founded the Sulpician Seminary in Baltimore.

He also encouraged Catholic religious orders of every kind to establish branches in the United States, and, with the help of George Washington, secured federal funds for Catholic missionaries to the Indians of the West.

In 1806, Bishop Carroll laid the cornerstone of Baltimore Cathedral, having helped a Mr. Latroke in the design of the building. Following the erection of four new Sees (Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Bardstown) in 1808, John Carroll was made Archbishop in 1811.

During his years as head of the U.S. church, the Catholic population of the country grew from about 25,000 to 200,000. Archbishop Carroll had the very difficult task of adjusting to an ancient faith a new political order, which he achieved with great skill. His devotion to the American principles, such as religious freedom and seperation of Church and State, enabled him to win the confidence of Catholics and Protestants alike. Indeed, Archbishop Carroll laid the foundation of the Catholic Church in America which is still an influence for the good in that bastion of democracy.

 

Source:

http://www.irishmidlandsancestry.com/content/offaly/people/carroll_john.htm

 

CARROL HIGHLIGHTS

Born in Upper Marlboro, Maryland, in 1735.

Ordained a Jesuit priest when he was 34. Educated in Europe, returned to America as a missionary in 1773.

In 1784, appointed first ”Superior of the Mission of the Thirteen United States“, and authorized to guide the infant

Church in this country.

Established Georgetown University; St. Mary’s Seminary, Baltimore; Mount St. Mary’s College and

Seminary, Emmitsburg, Maryland.

In 1776, sent by the Continental Congress with Benjamin Franklin and two others on an unsuccessful mission

 to Quebec to persuade French Canada to join in the revolution.

In 1789, Pope Pius VI created the Diocese of Baltimore with Carroll as its first bishop.

In 1804, became responsible for the territories in the Louisiana Purchase.

In 1808, named the first archbishop in the United States.

In 1810, ordained in Baltimore the first Bishops of Philadelphia, Boston and Bardstown.

His cousin, Charles Carroll of Carrollton, was the only Catholic signer of the Declaration of Independence.

His brother, Daniel, was one of the only two Catholic signers of the U.S. Constitution.

He died in December 1815, after serving 25 years as bishop and archbishop.

 

Bishops of Philadelphia

 

Bishop Michael Francis Egan O.F.M.

First bishop of Philadelphia, U.S.A., b. in Ireland, most probably in Galway, in 1761; d. at Philadelphia, 22 July, 1814. Entering the Order of St. Francis he was rapidly advanced to important offices. In his twenty-sixth year he was appointed guardian of St. Isidore's, the house of the Irish Franciscans, at Rome, and held this position for three years, when he was transferred to Ireland. After labouring for several years as a missionary in his native land, he responded to an earnest appeal of the Catholics of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and went to the United States. Though lacking the constitution demanded by the pastoral duties of that pioneer age, and suffering often from sickness, Father Egan's priestly zeal and his eloquence in the pulpit gained universal recognition, and, in April, 1803, he was appointed by Bishop Carroll one of the pastors of St. Mary's church in Philadelphia. On 8 April, 1808, Pope Pius VII erected this city into an episcopal see, with Michael Egan as first bishop. Archbishop Carroll describes him to the Roman authorities as "a man of about fifty who seems endowed with all the qualities to discharge with perfection all the functions of the episcopacy, except that he lacks robust health, greater experience and a greater degree of firmness in his disposition. He is a learned, modest, humble priest who maintains the spirit of his Order in his whole conduct." Owing to the Napoleonic troubles, the papal Bulls did not reach America until the year 1810. On 28 Oct. Bishop Egan was consecrated by Archbishop Carroll in St. Peter's church, Baltimore. His brief episcopate was embittered and his health shattered by the contumacious behaviour of the lay trustees of St. Mary's church, which he had chosen for his cathedral. These trustees, who were tainted with the irreligious notions of the times, without any legal right, and contrary to the canons of the Church, claimed the privilege of electing and deposing their pastors and of adjusting their salaries. This un-Catholic contention that "the laity own the churches and the clergy are their hired servants" disturbed the peace, retarded the progress, and threatened the existence of the Catholic religion in Pennsylvania during two episcopates. Bishop Egan's troubles were aggravated by the insubordination of two Irish priests whom he had admitted to the diocese, James Harold and his better-known nephew, William Vincent Harold. Bishop Egan died worn out by his struggles to maintain his episcopal authority.

Source:  http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05324c.htm

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

29 Sep 1761

 

Born

Ireland

1785

23.3

Ordained Priest

Priest of Order of Friars Minor

8 Apr 1808

46.5

Appointed

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

28 Oct 1810

49.1

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

22 Jul 1814

52.8

Died

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/beganm.html

 

 

Bishop Henry Conwell

 

Second Bishop of Philadelphia, U.S.A., b. at Moneymore, County Derry, Ireland, in 1745; d. at Philadelphia, 22 April, 1842. After the death of Bishop Egan, in 1814, the Bishopric of Philadelphia was offered successively to the Rev. Ambrose Marechal and to the Very Rev. Louis de Barth, the administrator, but both these clergymen, deterred by the contumacious attitude of the trustees of St. Mary's church, returned the Bulls; whereupon the Holy See appointed (26 Nov., 1819) Henry Conwell, parish priest of Dungannon and Vicar-General of Armagh, Ireland, who imprudently accepted a task too heavy for his seventy four years. He had made his studies in the Irish College at Paris, where his family had founded a burse. He was universally beloved by his people and the clergy, and an ineffectual attempt was made to retain him in Ireland. He was consecrated in London by Bishop Poynter, 24 Aug., 1820, and arrived in Philadelphia, 2 Dec., bringing with him a young priest named Keenan, subsequently for many years pastor at Lancaster. The seeds of future troubles had been sown during the vacancy, when the administrator, without demanding credentials, stationed at St. Mary's the brilliant but demagogic and unpriestly Rev. William Hogan, who had so ingratiated himself with the board of trustees that when, on 12 Dec., the bishop revoked his faculties, a schism ensued which lasted for many years. For details of the quarrel, the reader is referred to J. Gilmary Shea's "History of the Catholic Church in the United States" (see below). Bishop Conwell conducted the controversy with dignity, but in the course of it, through desire of peace, committed two errors of judgment. The first was the recalling to the diocese and appointing as vicar-general of William Vincent Harold, a Dominican whom his predecessor had dismissed. Contrary to the bishop's expectation, the return of Harold complicated the situation. It was a more serious mistake that on 9 Oct., 1826, he capitulated to the trustees, yielding to them the right of determining salaries and of vetoing his appointments. Highly displeased at this surrender of episcopal rights, the Holy See appointed an administrator and summoned the bishop to Rome. His explanations were pronounced unsatisfactory and he was forbidden to return to his see. He did return to Philadelphia and received permission to perform episcopal functions, without interfering in matters of administration. In 1830 Francis Patrick Kenrick arrived as coadjutor and administrator, and Bishop Conwell spent his remaining years in seclusion and prayer.

 

Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/04349a.htm

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

1748

 

Born

Ballyriff, Ireland

Nov 1776

28.8

Ordained Priest

Priest

26 Nov 1819

71.9

Appointed

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

24 Sep 1820

72.7

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

26 Nov 1820

72.9

Installed

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

22 Apr 1842

94.3

Died

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bconwell.html

 

 

 

Francis Patrick Kenrick

KENRICK, Francis Patrick, R. C. archbishop, born in Dublin, Ireland, 3 December, 1797; died in Baltimore, Maryland, 6 July, 1863. He prepared for the priesthood in the College of the Propaganda at Rome in 1815-'21, and in the latter year was selected to direct the newly established theological seminary at Bardstown, Kentucky.

 

During the jubilee of 1826-'7, he attended Bishop Flaget in his pastoral visitations, and gave public conferences on religion, which led to the polemical discussions in which he was frequently engaged during the rest of his life. In 1829 he attended the Council of Baltimore as theologian to Bishop Flaget, and was appointed assistant secretary.

 

He was nominated coadjutor bishop of Philadelphia in 1830, and was consecrated bishop of Arath in partibus infidelium on 6 June at Bardstown by Bishop Flaget. The administration of the diocese of Philadelphia required at this time great tact and firmness. The trustees of St. Mary's church, which was the bishop's cathedral, refused to recognize him as pastor, but he interdicted the church, and the trustees finally submitted to his authority. He then made a regulation that all church property in future should be vested in the bishop. The trustees of St. Paul's church, Pittsburg, refused to accept this regulation, but after a bitter contest the bishop had his way.

 

A large number of congregations in Pennsylvania were without pastors, and to remedy this evil he founded the Theological seminary of St. Charles Borromeo in Philadelphia in 1838. During the cholera epidemic of 1832 he was active in his ministrations to the sick. In 1842 he introduced the Order of the hermits of St. Augustine into his diocese, and helped them to build the College of St. Thomas at Villanova.

 

During the anti-Catholic riots of 1844 he constantly preached peace and forbearance, and patiently took measures to restore the edifices that had been destroyed. He aided in building St. Joseph's College in 1851, and another of the same name in Susquehanna county.

 

On the death of Archbishop Eccleson he was translated to the see of Baltimore in August, 1851, and appointed by the pope apostolic delegate to preside at a national council of all the archbishops and bishops of the United States in Baltimore in May, 1852. Some years afterward he was invested with a "primacy of honor" over the other archbishops.

 

During his stay in Baltimore a great impulse was given to the erection of charitable and educational institutions, among which were the Infant asylum, the Aged women's home, St. Agnes's asylum for destitute sick, the School of St. Laurence at Locust point, and the College of Loyola. He went to Rome in 1854 to take part in the deliberations that resulted in the definition of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception.

 

Archbishop Kenrick was a profound Hebrew scholar, and spoke the principal modern languages fluently. He is considered the ablest theologian that the Roman Catholic Church in the United States has produced, and his theological works have been largely used both in this country and in Europe. His works are "Letters of Omicron to Omega" (1828); " Four Sermons preached in the Cathedral of Bardstown " (Bardstown, 1829); "Theologia Dogmatica" (4 vols., Philadelphia, 1839-'40; new ed., 3 vols., Baltimore, 1857); " Theologia Moralis " (3 vols., Philadelphia, 1841-'3); "Letters on the Primacy of the Holy See and the Authority of General Councils." in reply to Bishop Hopkins of Vermont (1837; enlarged ed., with the title "The Primacy of the Apostolic See vindicated," Baltimore, 1855); "The Catholic Doctrine on Justification explained and vindicated" (Philadelphia, 1841); " Treatise on Baptism" (New York, 1843):" Vindication of the Catholic Church," a series of letters in reply to Bishop John H. Hopkins, and "End of Religious Controversy controverted " (Baltimore, 1855).

 

Archbishop Kenrick was dissatisfied with the condition of the text of the English Roman Catholic Bibles that were used in the United States, which had widely departed from the Rheims and Douay translations. He devoted himself to a careful translation on the basis of the original Rheims-Douay version, edited by Dr. Challoner, with copious notes. This includes "The New Testament" (2 vols., New York, 1849-'51); " Psalms, Books of Wisdom and Canticle of Canticles" (Baltimore, 1857); and "Job and the Prophets" (1859).

 

--His brother, KENRICK, Peter Richard, archbishop, born in Dublin, Ireland, 17 August, 1806, was educated in his native country, and, after finishing his theological course, was ordained priest about 1830. He followed his brother to the United States in 1833, and was appointed assistant pastor at the cathedral in Philadelphia.

 

Shortly afterward he also took charge of the "Catholic Herald," and in 1835 he became pastor of the cathedral parish. He was then made president of the diocesan seminary, in which he also filled the chair of dogmatic theology, and he was next raised to the rank of vicar-general of the diocese, and accredited by Bishop Brute as his theologian to the Third Provincial Council of Baltimore in 1837.

 

Bishop Rosati, of St. Louis, demanded the appointment of a coadjutor in 1841, and Father Kenrick was chosen for the post. He was consecrated bishop of Drasa in partibus infidelium in Philadelphia on 30 November, and succeeded Dr. Rosati as bishop of St. Louis, 25 September, 1843.

 

Bishop Kenrick found his diocese in financial trouble, and with a large quantity of unimproved real estate, but, as the result of his efforts, it was soon freed from debt. It comprised, when he became coadjutor, several states and territories, from which so many new sees have been made that at present it embraces only the eastern part of Missouri.

 

Bishop Kenrick gave a great impetus to the work of building churches, he delivered a series of lectures in St. Louis on the doctrines of his church, founded a magazine called the "Catholic Cabinet," and established various schools.

 

In 1847 St. Louis was created an archiepiscopal see by Plus IX, and Dr. Kenrick became archbishop. In 1858 he received large bequests that afterward enabled him to carry out successfully his plans for endowing charitable and other institutions in St Louis. During the civil war the archbishop devoted his energies to the relief of the sick and wounded of both sides.

 

When, after the war, a constitution was adopted by the state of Missouri, one of whose articles required all teachers and clergymen to take a stringent oath, he forbade his priests to do so, and the oath was afterward declared unconstitutional.

 

In the Vatican council he was one of the ablest opponents of the dogma of papal infallibility; but as his objection was not to the truth but the opportuneness of this doctrine, he at once accepted it when it was defined.  

Archbishop Kenrick has introduced into his diocese numerous religious orders, which have charge of four industrial schools and reformatories, and 88 parochial schools with 17,180 pupils. The cemetery of St. Louis, laid out by him, is one of the finest on the continent. Among his works are “The Holy House of Loretto, or An Examination of the Historical Evidence of its Miraculous Translation;” and "

 

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia by John Looby, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

 

 

KENRICK, Francis Patrick, R. C. archbishop, born in Dublin, Ireland, 3 December, 1797; died in Baltimore, Maryland, 6 July, 1863. He prepared for the priesthood in the College of the propaganda at Rome in 1815-'21, and in the latter year was selected to direct the newly established theological seminary at Bardstown, Kentucky During the jubilee of 1826-'7, he attended Bishop Flaget in his pas-total visitations, and gave public conferences on religion which led to the polemical discussions in which he was frequently engaged during the rest of his life. In 1829 he attended the council of Baltimore as theologian to Bishop Flaget, and was appointed assistant secretary. He was nominated coadjutor bishop of Philadelphia in 1830, and was consecrated bishop of Arath in partibus infidelium on 6 June at Bards-town by Bishop Flaget. The administration of the diocese of Philadelphia required at this time great tact and firmness. The trustees of St. Mary's church, which was the bishop's cathedral, refused to recognize him as pastor, but he interdicted the church, and the trustees finally submitted to his authority. He then made a regulation that all church property in future should be vested in the bishop. The trustees of St. Paul's church, Pitts-burg, refused to accept this regulation, but after a bitter contest the bishop had his way. A large number of congregations in Pennsylvania were without pastors, and to remedy this evil he founded the Theological seminary of St. Charles Borromeo in Philadelphia in 1838. During the cholera epidemic of 1832 he was active in his ministrations to the sick. In 1842 he introduced the Order of the hermits of St. Augustine into his diocese, and helped them to build the College of St. Thomas at Villanova. During the anti-Catholic riots of 1844 he constantly preached peace and forbearance, and patiently took measures to restore the edifices that had been destroyed. He aided in building St. Joseph's college in 1851, and another of the same name in Susquehanna county. On the death of Archbishop Eccleson he was translated to the see of Baltimore in August, 1851, and appointed by the pope apostolic delegate to preside at a national council of all the archbishops and bishops of the United States in Baltimore in May, 1852. Some years afterward he was invested with a " primacy of honor" over the other archbishops. During his stay in Baltimore a great impulse was given to the erection of charitable and educational institutions, among which were the Infant asylum, the Aged women's home, St. Agnes's asylum for destitute sick, the School of St. Laurence at Locust point, and the College of Loyola. He went to Rome in 1854 to take part in the deliberations that resulted in the definition of the dogma of the immaculate conception. Archbishop Kenrick was a profound Hebrew scholar, and spoke the principal modern languages fluently. He is considered the ablest theologian that the Roman Catholic church in the United States has produced, and his theological works have been largely used both in this country and in Europe. His works are "Letters of Omicron to Omega" (1828); " Four Sermons preached in the Cathedral of Bardstown " (Bards-town, 1829); "Theologia Dogmatica" (4 vols., Philadelphia, 1839-'40; new ed., 3 vols., Baltimore, 1857); " Theologia Moralis " (3 vols., Philadelphia, 1841-'3); "Letters on the Primacy of the Holy See and the Authority of General Councils." in reply to Bishop Hopkins of Vermont (1837; enlarged ed., with the title "The Primacy of the Apostolic See vindicated," Baltimore, 1855); "The Catholic Doctrine on Justification explained and vindicated" (Philadelphia, 1841); " Treatise on Baptism" (New York, 1843):" Vindication of the Catholic Church," a series of letters in reply to Bishop John H. Hopkins, and "End of Religious Controversy controverted " (Baltimore, 1855). Archbishop Kenrick was dissatisfied with the condition of the text of the English Roman Catholic Bibles that were used in the United States, which had widely departed from the Rheims and Douay translations. He devoted himself to a careful translation on the basis of the original Rhemish-Douay version, edited by Dr. Challoner, with copious notes. This includes "The New Testament" (2 vols., New York, 1849-'51); " Psalms, Books of Wisdom and Canticle of Canticles" (Baltimore, 1857); and "Job and the Prophets" (1859).--His brother, Peter Richard, archbishop, born in Dublin, Ireland, 17 August, 1806, was educated in his native country, and, after finishing his theological course, was ordained priest about 1830. He followed his brother to the United States in 1833, and was appointed assistant pastor at the cathedral in Philadelphia. Shortly afterward he also took charge of the " Catholic Herald," and in 1835 he became pastor of the cathedral parish. He was then made president of the diocesan seminary, in which he also filled the chair of dogmatic theology, and he was next raised to the rank of vicar-general of the diocese, and accredited by Bishop Brute as his theologian to the Third provincial council of Baltimore in 1837. Bishop Rosati, of St. Louis, demanded the appointment of a coadjutor in 1841, and Father Kenrick was chosen for the post. He was consecrated bishop of Drasa in partibus infidelium in Philadelphia on 30 November, and succeeded Dr. Rosati as bishop of St. Louis, 25 September, 1843. Bishop Kenrick found his diocese in financial trouble, and with a large quantity of unimproved real estate, but, as the result of his efforts, it was soon freed from debt. It comprised, when he became coadjutor, several states and territories, from which so many new sees have been made that at present it embraces only the eastern part of Missouri. Bishop Kenrick gave a great impetus to the work of building churches, he delivered a series of lectures in St. Louis on the doctrines of his church, founded a magazine called the "Catholic Cabinet," and established various schools. In 1847 St. Louis was created an archiepiscopal see by Plus IX., and Dr. Kenrick became archbishop In 1858 he received large bequests that afterward enabled him to carry out successfully his plans for endowing charitable and other institutions in St Louis. During the civil war the archbishop devoted his energies to the relief of the sick and wounded of both sides. When, after the war, a constitution was adopted by the state of Missouri, one of whose articles required all teachers and clergymen to take a stringent oath, he forbade his priests to do so, and the oath was afterward declared unconstitutional. In the Vatican council he was one of the ablest opponents of the dogma of papal infallibility; but as his objection was not to the truth but the opportuneness of this doctrine, he at once accepted it when it was defined Archbishop Kenrick has introduced into his diocese numerous religious orders, which have charge of four industrial schools and reformatories, and 88 parochial schools with 17,180 pupils. The cemetery of St. Louis, laid out by him, is one of the finest on the continent. Among his works are "The Holy House of Loretto, or An Examination of the Historical Evidence of its Miraculous Translation"; and "Anglican Ordinations."

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

3 Dec 1796

 

Born

Dublin, Ireland

2 Apr 1821

24.3

Ordained Priest

Priest

25 Feb 1830

33.2

Appointed

Coadjutor Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

6 Jun 1830

33.5

Ordained Bishop

Coadjutor Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

22 Apr 1842

45.4

Succeeded

Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

19 Aug 1851

54.7

Appointed

Archbishop of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

9 Oct 1851

54.8

Installed

Archbishop of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

8 Jul 1863

66.6

Died

Archbishop of Baltimore, Maryland, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bkenrickf.html

 

Bishop William O'Hara

Scranton, PA

O'HARA, William, R. C. bishop, born in County Derry, Ireland, about 18161 His parents emigrated to the United States in 1820 and settled in Philadelphia, where the son received his early education. He afterward entered Georgetown college, but, deciding to become a priest, he went to Rome and studied for eleven years in the Urban college of the propaganda. He was ordained in 1843 and appointed pastor of St. Patrick's church, Philadelphia, where he remained, in 1856. He was subsequently professor in the Seminary of St. Charles Borromeo, and for some time acted as its rector. He became vicar-general of the diocese in 1860. In 1868 the diocese of Scranton was formed out of that of Philadelphia, and Dr. O'Hara was appointed its first bishop, and consecrated on 12 July. The new diocese contained fifty churches, most of them of a very primitive character, attended by twenty-eight priests. At present (1888) there are seventy-nine priests, seventy-four churches, forty-six stations, and twelve convents.

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

14 Apr 1816

 

Born

Dungiven, Ireland

21 Dec 1842

26.7

Ordained Priest

Priest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

3 Mar 1868

51.9

Appointed

Bishop of Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA

12 Jul 1868

52.2

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA

3 Feb 1899

82.8

Died

Bishop of Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/boharaw.html

 

 

Molly Maguires and Archbishop Wood

The miners, most of them Catholic, were further isolated when Archbishop James Woods of Philadelphia, a man who had converted from the Episcopal Church to Catholicism and who had more in common with his friend Gowen (railroad and mine owner) than with the poor Irish miners, banned all secret societies, including the AOH, and threatened its members with excommunication. As Gowen himself would later put it, "when these assassins, through their counsel, speak of being Catholics, I desire to say to you that they have been denounced by their Church and excommunicated by their prelates, and that I have the direct personal authority of Archbishop Wood himself to say that he denounces them all and that he was fully cognizant of and approved of the means I took to bring them to justice."

Source: Making Sense of the Molly Maguires – Kevin Kenny

 

James Frederic Wood

WOOD, James Frederic, archbishop, born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 27 April, 1813; died there, 20 June. 1883. His father, an Englishman who had settled in this country, carried on the business of an importer. The child was sent in his eighth year to his English relatives in Gloucester, where for five years he attended the free-school of St. Mary de Crypt. In his fifteenth year he left Philadelphia for Cincinnati, where he had been appointed clerk in a branch of the United States bank, and in 1833 he became teller in the Franklin bank of that city, and in 1836 its cashier. He was received into the Roman Catholic church in April, 1836, by Archbishop Purcell, and a few months later resigned his post in the bank and went to Rome to study for the priesthood. In the College of the propaganda, where he remained nearly seven years, the authorities appointed him prefect of discipline. After his ordination in 1844 he returned to Cincinnati, where he acted as assistant rector in the cathedral for ten years, and in 1854 he was appointed to the pastorate of St. Patrick's. In 1857 he was consecrated bishop of Gratianopolis in partibus and afterward he was transferred to Philadelphia, his native city, where he was to act as coadjutor to Bishop Neumann with the right of succession. The Philadelphia diocese at that time had hastily undertaken more than it seemed likely to be able to accomplish, and financial difficulties were producing apathy. Many institutions for religion, education, and benevolence, a magnificent cathedral among the number, had been begun, but their expense, so far cheerfully borne, was beginning to be severely felt by the Roman Catholic population. As a consequence, many of the buildings had been stopped altogether, and the others were advancing in a slow and half-hearted way. But from the moment of Bishop Wood's arrived things began to improve. Instead of waiting for the completion of the cathedral to form its parish, he called a very strong one into instant existence by simply erecting a large but inexpensive cathedral chapel, thus securing immediate and permanent financial aid, which he then gradually augmented by general collections. Bishop Neumann dying in 1860, his successor could devote himself with still greater efficiency to the wants of the diocese. The cathedral was hardly finished in 1864 when the foundation was laid at Overbrook of the Seminary of St. Charles, the cost of which, $500,000, was fully justified by the demands for pastors that were made by new churches. Many other institutions--educational, charitable, or religious--were either auspiciously begun or brought to a successful issue during his administration. He was taken away from his ordinary duties three times by orders to present himself at Rome--in 1862 to assist at the canonization of the Japanese martyrs, in 1867 to celebrate the 1800th anniversary of St. Peter and St. Paul, and in 1869 to take active part at the Vatican council. In 1871, the s flourishing state of the diocese making a division necessary, several episcopal districts were formed, over which he was created archbishop in 1875. In 1880 he assisted at the Baltimore provincial council, anal in 1882 the twenty-fifth anniversary of his elevation to the bishopric was celebrated enthusiastically. His health was now feeble, yet he allowed himself little or no relaxation from his numerous duties. Among his favorite projects had been that of providing the cathedral with a grand altar, decorating the interior in befitting style, and then paying off the debt. Most of this he had successfully accomplished when death put a sudden end to his labors. He was noted for his knowledge of sanitary laws as applicable to the construction of new buildings, and no Roman Catholic institution was erected without this subject receiving his careful consideration. He was especially hostile to the introduction of political issues wood from other countries into the United States, and the stand he took on this question sometimes created discontent among his flock.

Edited Appletons Encyclopedia, Copyright © 2001 VirtualologyTM

 

 

Archbishop John Patrick Ryan

Sixth Bishop and second Archbishop of Philadelphia, b. At Thurles, County Tipperary, Ireland, 20 February, 1831; d. At Philadelphia; 11 February, 1911. His early education was received at the school of the Christian Brothers in his native town. In his twelfth year he entered the select school of Mr. J. L. Naughton, Richmond Street, Dublin, where he began his Classical studies. In 1844, while a pupil at Mr. Naughton's school, he headed a delegation of students, and in their name made an address to Daniel O'Connell, then a prisoner in Richmond Bridewell Prison. It is said that the great Liberator complimented the young speaker, and predicted a brilliant future for him. In 1847 he was adopted for the Diocese of St. Louis in the United States by Archbishop Peter Richard Kenrick and entered St. Patrick's College, Carlow. In 1852 he finished his course and was advanced to deacon's orders, but being too young to be ordained priest, he set out for St. Louis with Rev. Patrick Feehan, a subject of the same diocese, and afterward Archbishop of Chicago, and on his arrival was appointed to teach in the Diocesan Seminary at Carondelet. On account of his exceptional ability as a public speaker, Archbishop Kenrick permitted. the young deacon to preach frequently in the cathedral. His fame went forth at once, and he drew large audiences, made up not only of the regular members of the congregation, but of the most prominent people of all denominations from various parts of the city and more distant points. On 8 September, 1853, by special dispensation, he was ordained priest and was appointed assistant rector at the cathedral. He served there as assistant and as rector until 1861, when he was appointed to build the Church of the Annunciation at St. Louis. Having completed this task promptly and successfully, he was transferred to the rectorship of St. John's parish, at St. Louis. During all these years he was noted for his zeal in the work of the ministry, for his faithfulness in attending the military prisoners in Gratiot Street Prison during the Civil War, for the frequency and effectiveness of his sermons, and for the large number of converts, many of them persons of note, who by his influence were brought into the Church.

In 1866 he attended the Second Plenary Council of Baltimore as one of Archbishop Kenrick's theologians, and was one of three priests chosen to preach on that occasion, the others being Archbishop John Lancaster Spalding, and the late Rev. Isaac Hecker, C.S.P. In 1868 he spent a year in Europe with Archbishop Kenrick. His fame as an orator had preceded him, and he received calls from all sides. At Rome, at the request of Pope Pius IX, he delivered the English Lenten course for that year. Archbishop Kenrick appointed him vicar-general and administrator of the diocese, during his attendance at the Vatican Council. On 14 February, 1872, he was consecrated titular Bishop of Tricomia, and Coadjutor Bishop of St. Louis with right of succession. After serving faithfully and successfully in this capacity for twelve years, he was made titular Archbishop of Salamis on 6 January, 1884.

In the meantime the See of Philadelphia had become vacant by the death of Archbishop Wood, and on 8 June, 1884, Archbishop Ryan was appointed to succeed him. During his reign in Philadelphia the Church grew rapidly, as can be seen by the following table:

  • Churches — 127 in 1884; 297 in 1911
  • Priests — 260 in 1884; 582 in 1911
  • Nuns — 1020 in 1884; 2565 in 1911
  • Schools — 59 in 1884; 141 in 1911
  • Pupils — 22,000 in 1884; 66,612 in 1911
  • Orphans supported — 998 in 1884; 3,230 in 1911
  • Catholic population — 300,000 in 1884; 525,000 in 1911

During that time also the Roman Catholic High School for Boys, which was endowed by Mr. Thomas Cahill, was built, and put in operation; high school centres for girls taught by the different communities were established; a new central high school for girls was partly endowed and begun; St. Francis' Industrial School for Boys was endowed and successfully operated, the Philadelphia Protectory for Boys was erected: it has since been enlarged, at a cost of over half a million dollars and with capacity for six hundred; St. Joseph's Home for Working Boys was founded; a new foundling asylum and maternity hospital was built; a new St. Vincent's Home for younger orphan children was purchased with the archbishop's Golden Jubilee Fund of $200,000; a third Home for the Aged was erected; a Memorial Library Building, dedicated to the Archbishop, was begun at St. Charles' Seminary, Overbrook; and the three Catholic hospitals of the city doubled their capacity. The extent of the archbishop's zeal is shown by his care for the emigrants who came into the diocese during his time. In 1884 there were very few foreign churches in the diocese; now there are 20 for the Italians, 23 for the Poles, 18 for the Greeks, 15 for the Slovacs, 6 for the Lithuanians, and several for other nationalities.

The archbishop took special interest in the Indians and negroes. He established two congregations for the latter in Philadelphia, and invited the Holy Ghost Fathers to build their college and mother-house at Cornwells, near the city. Under his direction Mother Katharine Drexel founded the Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament, who devote themselves entirely to the Indians and negroes, with their mother-house, novitiate and orphan asylum at Cornwells and several convents and schools in the West and South. Another proof of this interest is found in the archbishop's attendance at the Lake Mohonk conferences, and at the meetings of the U. S. Indian Commission, to which he had been appointed by President Roosevelt. By his prudence and tact he removed much prejudice against the Church, and obtained special privileges for Catholics in public institutions. His great reputation as an orator brought him invitations to speak, not only at the most important ecclesiastical functions, but also on secular occasions. In addition to his monthly sermons, in St. Louis on the first Sunday, and in Philadelphia on the second, he preached frequently at the laying of corner-stones, at the consecration of bishops, and churches, and at funerals. Some of the more remarkable instances were the dedication of St. Patrick's Cathedral, New York, the conferring of the pallium on Archbishop Corrigan, and his funeral sermon; the consecration and funeral of Archbishop Hennessy of Dubuque, and the funeral of Archbishop Kenrick of St. Louis. He addressed the St. Louis Legislature twice; opened the St. Louis University on two occasions; spoke before the Committee of the United States Senate on Indian affairs; opened the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia in 1900, and was the principal speaker at the McKinley Memorial service in Philadelphia, after the president's assassination.

He lectured on various occasions, the most important of his lectures probably being on "What Catholics do not believe", St. Louis, 1877, and on "Agnosticism", Philadelphia, 1894. He received the degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of St. Louis and from the University of Pennsylvania. Under his guidance the Catholic "Standard and Times" of Philadelphia, his official organ, obtained a reputation unexcelled in Catholic journalism; and under his editorial direction the "American Catholic Quarterly Review" preserved and extended the reputation which it had already made as a leading exponent of Catholic thought. The celebrations of the Silver Jubilee of the archbishop in the episcopacy, 1897, and of his Golden Jubilee in the priesthood, 1903, proved the esteem in which he was held by the whole community, irrespective of creed, because the whole city rejoiced; while his death showed how universally he was loved, for the whole city wept. The archbishop was best known as an orator and a wit. He was adorned most by strong faith and piety, by great meekness and humility, and by a prudence that was far-reaching and admirable. He has left no published works except some lectures. These are: "Modern Religious Skepticism"; "What Catholics do not Believe"; "Christian Civilization", and "Agnosticism": all are published by the Catholic Truth Society of San Francisco as well as by similar organizations in this country and London. There is a fifth lecture on "Religion and the Fine Arts".

 

 

Archbishop Edmond Francis Prendergast

The Most Reverend Edmond Francis Prendergast

(1843-February 26, 1918)

In 1918, a new and glorious precedent occurred: the servitor of the Archbishops of Philadelphia himself rose to the leadership of the third largest American See: Edmond Francis Prendergast was the first Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia and Vicar-General to Archbishop Ryan, Rector of St. Malachy's Church, a graduate of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, a priest of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. A native son...almost.

Edmond Prendergast was born in Ireland in 1843. He was born into a family of ecclesiastics, which eventually lead him to the United States and Philadelphia. He was one of the first priests to be ordained in the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul, and on that cold November day in that new Cathedral, it would've been hard for him to imagine that almost half a century later the cathedra (throne) that he was kneeling in front of for the imposition of hands by Bishop Wood would be his.

Then, as has been stated before, the Archdiocese still encompassed most of the state. So over it's vast terrain he served, until in 1874 the 31 year-old Father Prendergast was called back to his second home, Philadelphia, and St. Malachy's. In this position, he was not far from the chancery and Cathedral (the Seminary moved from behind the Cathedral to Overbrook in 1871). Here, he was used as valued counsel to Bishop Wood, who shortly after became the first Metropolitan Archbishop of the Philadelphia Province, and Archbishop Ryan.

In 1897, he was consecrated Titular Bishop of Scillio and Auxiliary to Archbishop Ryan (he was made Vicar General the year before).

When he was appointed Auxiliary Bishop, Archbishop Ryan did not want Bishop Prendergast to leave his work at Saint Malachy's. Therefore, he stayed as Rector. To this day, the active Auxiliary Bishops of Philadelphia who do not possess chancery offices are made pastors of parishes. (As of this publication, Bishop Louis DeSimone is Pastor of Saint Monica's Church in South Philadelphia; and Bishop Robert Maginnis is Pastor of St. Colman Church in Ardmore (a suburb of Philadelphia).

As Archbishop Ryan's health failed, his auxiliary took up more and more administrative duties and, upon his death, was elected Administrator in the period of the Sede Vacante ad nunctum Sanctae Sedis (Vacant See). Then, the hopes and prayers of the people were answered with his appointment by Saint Pius X to the see that he already had administration over for three months.

Due to his elevation and old age (he was 68 upon his installation), he needed a successor to himself as Auxiliary Bishop. The choice was the Reverend John Joseph McCort, the Rector of Our Mother of Sorrows Church in Philadelphia, a former professor at the Seminary and one who was, in almost all ways, like his Archbishop: paternalistic, conservative, pastoral. He became Titular Bishop of Azotus with his consecration in mid-1912. (Before Archbishop Ryan's death, he served with then-Bishop Prendergast as Vicar General).

The Archdiocese continued to grow by leaps and bounds. And, in 1915, upon Archbishop Prendergast's Golden Sacerdotal Jubilee, the Cathedral was renovated and formally dedicated finally. This was the peak of Archbishop Prendergast's time as Archbishop, but afterward it fell steeply downhill. Over the next two years, in the face of war and adversity, he became gravely ill and died on February 26, 1918. Bishop McCort had many admirers who wanted to see him succeed to the See and continue the good works of Ryan and Prendergast. But another former Seminary professor was called home, one who revolutionized the whole Archdiocesan system.

Exerpted from The Bishops of Philadelphia, by Rocco Palmo, (Used with Permission)

Source: http://www.prendie.com/history.htm

 

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

3 May 1843

 

Born

Clonmel, Ireland

17 Nov 1865

22.5

Ordained Priest

Priest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

27 Nov 1895

52.6

Appointed

Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

27 Nov 1895

52.6

Appointed

Titular Bishop of Scilium

24 Feb 1897

53.8

Ordained Bishop

Titular Bishop of Scilium

27 May 1911

68.1

Appointed

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

27 Feb 1918

74.8

Died

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bpreef.html

 

Monsignor John J. Bonner

 

History

Rt. Reverend Monsignor John J. Bonner, D.D., L.L.D., son of Hugh A. and Susan Fleming Bonner, was born in Philadelphia, November 2, 1890.  He attended St. Agatha’s School for two years and Our Mother of Sorrows School on Lancaster Avenue for six years.  After graduating from Roman Catholic High School in 1908, he entered St. Charles Borromeo Seminary and later studied at the North American
College in Rome.  He was ordained in the Basilica of St. John Lateran on June 2, 1917 by Cardinal Pompilii.

His first appointment was as assistant rector of St. Bridget’s Church in Philadelphia.  After service as an Army chaplain in World War I, he was named assistant principal of Roman Catholic High School, April 21, 1919.  In 1923 he was transferred to Easton as an assistant rector of St. Bernard’s Church.  In 1924 he was again appointed assistant rector at St. Bridget’s Church.  He was named dean of Immaculata College until August 1926, when he was appointed Diocesan Superintendent of Schools.

Monsignor Bonner, who was named a Domestic Prelate in 1930 by Pope Pius XI, was a member of many Catholic educational associations.  He was president of the Catholic Association of Pennsylvania and treasurer of the National Catholic Education Association.  He won wide recognition as a teacher, orator, and educator and took deep interest in retreats for laymen.  In 1929, he was awarded an honorary degree of Doctor of Law by Villanova College, and a few years later was similarly honored by St. Joseph’s College.

According to the American Catholic Historical Society, “Monsignor Bonner was the best-known Catholic educator in the country.”  Among his achievements in his nineteen-year tenure as superintendent were the increase in the number of tuition-free diocesan high schools from three to twelve and the founding of the Philadelphia Catholic League.

On November 27, 1945, Monsignor Bonner died of a heart attack in his office at John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls’ High School.  In 1953, to meet the increasing demand for a Catholic high school in the expanding western suburbs, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia converted the vacated St. Vincent’s Orphanage into a school for boys under the title Archbishop Prendergast High School.  Three years later a new building was erected on the same tract and named Monsignor Bonner High School in memory of Rev. John J. Bonner, the former diocesan superintendent of schools.  Bonner then became a school for boys, and Prendergast was designated as a school for girls.

Both schools, although independent and under separate administration, share the same spacious campus. There is some exchange of students between the two schools for certain classes.

Source: http://www.bonnerhigh.com/bonner.aspx?pgID=880

 

 

Bishop Phillip Richard McDevitt

Bishop of Harrisburg

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

12 Jul 1858

 

Born

Santa Anna, PA

14 Jul 1885

27.0

Ordained Priest

Priest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

10 Jul 1916

58.0

Appointed

Bishop of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA

21 Sep 1916

58.2

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA

11 Nov 1935

77.3

Died

Bishop of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bmcdevittp.html

Archbishop Thomas Francis Kennedy

Official of Roman Curia - Other

Titular Archbishop of Seleucia in Isauria

Titular See: (Rector/North American College)

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

23 Mar 1858

 

Born

Conshohocken, PA, USA

24 Jul 1887

29.3

Ordained Priest

Priest

15 Dec 1907

49.7

Appointed

Official of Roman Curia - Other

15 Dec 1907

49.7

Appointed

Titular Bishop of Hadrianopolis in Honoriade

29 Dec 1907

49.8

Ordained Bishop

Titular Bishop of Hadrianopolis in Honoriade

17 Jun 1915

57.2

Appointed

Archbishop (Personal Title) of Roman Curia - Other

17 Jun 1915

57.2

Appointed

Titular Archbishop of Seleucia in Isauria

28 Aug 1917

59.4

Died

Official of Roman Curia - Other

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bkennedyt.html

 

 

Dennis Joseph Cardinal Dougherty

1865-1951

8/16/1865                     Born in Homesville, Girardville, Pennsylvania the sixth of ten children of Patrick (b.1835) and Bridget Henry both of County Mayo, Ireland

8/1865                          Baptized at St. Joseph Church Ashland, PA by Rev. Michael A. Sheridan

                                      Confirmed by Archbishop James F. Wood, D.D.

1879                              St. Mary’s College Montreal, Canada

1881                              St. Charles Seminary Overbrook, PA

1885-1890                   Ordained a Priest by Cardinal Ludico Parocchi in the Basilica of St. John Lateran, Rome

6/1/1890                       First Mass, Altar of the Chair in St. Peters, Rome

1890-1903                   Professor of Latin, English, History and Theology St. Charles Seminary Overbrook, PA

6/14/1903                     Consecrated Bishop by Cardinal Satolli in the chapel of St. Paul of the Cross in SS. John and Paul Rome

1903-1908                   Bishop of Nueva Segovia, Philippine Islands

1908-1915                   Bishop of Jaro, Philippine Islands

5/31/1915                     25th Anniversary of Priestly Ordination

1915-1918                   Bishop of Buffalo, New York

4/30/1918                     Appointed Archbishop of Philadelphia, PA

7/10/1918                     Installed as Archbishop of Philadelphia, PA

5/6/1919                       Invested with the Pallium by Archbishop John Bonzano, Apostolic Delegate to the United States

3/7/1921                       Created Cardinal Priest by Pope Benedict XV

2/6/1922                       Attended Coronation of Pius XI – missed conclave due to distance and timing. One of the first acts of the new Pope was to lengthen the time between the death of a Pope and the conclave so that American Cardinals could attend and vote in the conclave.

6/14/1928                     25th Anniversary of the Episcopal Consecration

1/1/1937                       Papal Legate to the 33rd International Eucharistic Congress in Manila, Philippine Islands

3/2/1939                       Participated in conclave which elected Pope Pius XII

5/31/1940                     50th Anniversary of Priestly Ordination

3/7/1946                       25th Anniversary of being created a Cardinal

6/6/1949                       Papal Legate to the National Eucharistic Congress in St. Paul, Minnesota

6/21/1948                Delivered the Invocation at the Republican National Convention in Philadelphia’s Convention Hall

7/12/1948                Delivered the Invocation at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia’s Convention Hall

Fall 1950                 Holy Year pilgrimage to Rome

5/31/1951                Death of Cardinal Dougherty on the 61st Anniversary of his Ordination to the Priesthood

During his years as the Archbishop of Philadelphia, Cardinal Dougherty earned the title, "God's Bricklayer."  Throughout the ten county archdiocese he founded or built 110 parishes, 70 churches, 122 grammar schools, three colleges, nine diocesan high schools, fourteen academies, seven hospitals, seven orphanages, seven homes for the aged, and several institutions for various social services.

At the time of his death, Dennis Joseph Dougherty was 85 years old, a Priest for 61 years, Bishop for 48 years, Archbishop of Philadelphia for 33 years and a Cardinal for 30 years.

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

16 Aug 1865

 

Born

Honesville, PA

31 May 1890

24.8

Ordained Priest

Priest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

10 Jun 1903

37.8

Appointed

Bishop of Nueva Segovia, Philippines

14 Jun 1903

37.8

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Nueva Segovia, Philippines

19 Apr 1908

42.7

Appointed

Bishop of Jaro, Philippines

21 Jun 1908

42.8

Installed

Bishop of Jaro, Philippines

6 Dec 1915

50.3

Appointed

Bishop of Buffalo, New York, USA

9 Dec 1915

50.3

Installed

Bishop of Buffalo, New York, USA

1 May 1918

52.7

Appointed

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

10 Jul 1918

52.9

Installed

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

7 Mar 1921

55.6

Elevated to Cardinal

 

7 Mar 1921

55.6

Appointed

Cardinal-Priest of Ss. Nereo ed Achilleo

31 May 1951

85.8

Died

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bdoudj.html

 

 

John Francis Cardinal O’Hara, C.S.C

Bishop O’Hara was one of eight children.  He was born in 1888 in Ann Arbor, Michigan.   When his father was named American Consul to Uruguay, young John went with him to Montevideo.  While only seventeen, he became a private secretary to the U.S. Minister in that republic.  At eighteen, he was making market surveys for the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic Service.  Even while thus working, the future Bishop found time to attend the Jesuit University in Montevideo.  Upon his return to the States, John Francis went to the University of Notre Dame and was graduated in 1911.  Having graduated, he entered the seminary of the Holy Cross Fathers and after five years of intensive study of the Sacred Sciences, was ordained to the Holy Priesthood in 1916.

 

One year later, he returned to Notre Dame.  There, he held such posts as Instructor of Religion, Dean of the College of Commerce and Vice-President.  In 1934, he was elected President and served in that capacity until 1939 when he was consecrated bishop.   He served as Bishop of Buffalo from 1945 to 1952.    His long years as an educator at one of the greatest universities in the country prepared him to meet the pressing problems of Catholic education.  His dream and greatest accomplishment was to establish a Diocesan Catholic High School system, opening 23 schools over time in the Diocese of Buffalo.  Forty years ago, his mission was memorialized in a special way with the opening of Cardinal O'Hara High School

In 1952 he was named Archbishop of Philadelphia and in 1958 was named Cardinal by Pope John XXIII.  John Francis O'Hara died in 1960 and is buried on the campus of Notre Dame University.

Source: http://www.cardinalohara.com/cohs.htm

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

1 Aug 1888

 

Born

Ann Arbor, MI

9 Sep 1916

28.1

Ordained Priest

Priest of Congregation of Holy Cross

11 Dec 1939

51.4

Appointed

Bishop of Military, USA

11 Dec 1939

51.4

Appointed

Titular Bishop of Mylasa

15 Jan 1940

51.5

Ordained Bishop

Titular Bishop of Mylasa

10 Mar 1945

56.6

Appointed

Bishop of Buffalo, New York, USA

8 May 1945

56.8

Installed

Bishop of Buffalo, New York, USA

23 Nov 1951

63.3

Appointed

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

15 Dec 1958

70.4

Elevated to Cardinal

 

15 Dec 1958

70.4

Appointed

Cardinal-Priest of Ss. Andrea e Gregorio al Monte Celio

28 Aug 1960

72.1

Died

Archbishop of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/boharaj.html

 

Old St. Mary's Church & Cemetery

 

Olde St. Augustine Church

 

St. Augustine’s Church and Villanova University

 

Reverend Michael Hurley, O.S.A., D.D.

Reverend Michael Hurley, O.S.A., D.D.


Commissary General of the American Augustinians, 1820-1837, and second pastor of Saint Augustine's Church, Philadelphia, 1820-1837. Portrait painted in 1813 by Thomas Sully

 

 

.

Rev. Matthew Carr, O.S.A.

This photograph was taken from a fine pastel, apparently unsigned, of late eighteenth century origin of Reverend Matthew Carr, O.S.A., S.T.B. Father Carr was founder of the Augustinian Province in the United States in 1796, first pastor of Saint Augustine's Church in Philadelphia from 1796 to 1820, and first Commissary General from 1796 to 1820.

 

 

 

Old Saint Augustine's Church
Old Saint Augustine's Church opened for divine worship on 7 June 1801 and stood at Fourth and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Nicholas Fitz Maurice Fagan designed the structure.

Saint Augustine's Church at Fourth and Vine streets in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania was burned during a display of anti-Catholicism on 8 May 1844. The Augustinians of Villanova, fearing a know-nothing onslaught against the college, did sentry duty on the grounds while students vacated the dormitories to sleep off the campus.

Interior of Olde Saint Augustine's Church restored for its Bicentennial. Founded in 1796 at 4th and Vine Streets in Philadelphia, suffered extensive damage during a storm in December 1992. The Church lost its steeple and a portion of its roof resulting in severe water damage to its decorative plasterwork and paintings.
(postcard, Brawer & Hauptman, Architects. 20 North 3rd Street. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106).

Old Saint Augustine's Church

 

 

Reverend John P. O'Dwyer, O.S.A., S.T.L.

Reverend John P. O'Dwyer, O.S.A., S.T.L. (1816-1850)

First and Third President of Villanova College

1843-1847 and 1848-1850

Father John Possidius O'Dwyer was born in Callan, County Kilkenny, Ireland, in 1816. His early education in Kilkenny led to his entrance into the Augustinian novitiate at Grantstown, Wexford, in 1835. After his profession of vows in 1836 he was sent to Italy for higher studies.

 

 

 

Reverend William Harnett, O.S.A.

William Harnett, O.S.A. (1822-1875)

Second, Fourth and Sixth President of Villanova College

1847-1848 and 1850-1851 and 1855-1857

Father William Harnett was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1822. He was the first American-born to enter the Augustinian Order in the Province of Saint Thomas of Villanova. He entered the novitiate and continued his studies in Italy, where at Genazzano his Novice Master was Blessed Stephen Bellesini. He returned to the United States in 1843 and taught Latin and Greek at Villanova College. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1844 by Bishop Francis Patrick Kendrick of Philadelphia.

Father Harnett was President of Villanova College from 1847 to 1848, 1850 to 1851 and 1855 to 1857. He also served at Saint Augustine's in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and at Saint Mary's, in Lawrence, Massachusetts. He died in Lawrence, Massachusetts on 28 March 1875, at the age of 55. He is buried at Saint Mary's Cemetery in Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Source: Necrology of the Augustinian Provinces of the United States of America

(Revised, May 2000).

 

 

Reverend Patrick E. Moriarty, O.S.A., D.D.  (1805-1875)

Fifth President of Villanova College

1851-1855

Father Moriarty was President of Villanova College, 1851-1855, and was a renowned Catholic orator.  It was Moriarty, who with Reverend Thomas Kyle, O.S.A., made the offer to buy the Belle-Air estate on 13 October 1841.  (Photograph oil on canvas by Max Soltmann based on an earlier lithograph by Henry McKeon).

Father Patrick Eugene Moriarty was born in Ireland in 1805. He studied there at Carlow College and later in Italy, where he was ordained in Rome in 1828.

Father Moriarty spent a short time in Ireland following ordination, after which he went to the newly established Vicariate of Madras, India. There he served as Chaplain to the General Hospital Garrison at Fort St. George. Between 1832 and 1834, Father Moriarty served as a military chaplain in Lisbon, Portugal.

 

Reverend Patrick E. Moriarty, O.S.A., D.D.

Presidents of Villanova

Other Presidents with Irish Roots:

Ambrose Augustine Mullen, O.S.A. (1827-1876) Seventh President of Villanova College 1865-1869

Patrick Augustine Stanton, O.S.A. (1826-1891) Eighth President of Villanova College 1869-1872

Father Patrick Stanton was born in Castlebar,County Mayo, Ireland, in 1826 and was a nephew of

Reverend Thomas A. Kyle, O.S.A.

 

Thomas Galberry, O.S.A. (1833-1878) Ninth President of Villanova College 1872-1876

Bishop Thomas Galberry was born in County Kildare, Ireland, in 1833. He entered the Augustinian novitiate at Villanova, Pennsylvania. His ordination to the priesthood by Bishop John Neumann of Philadelphia took place in 1856.

 

John Joseph Fedigan, O.S.A. (1842-1908) Eleventh President of Villanova College 1878-1880

Father John Joseph Fedigan was born in Rathbran, Ireland on 27 April 1842. He studied at Saint Mary's College in Wilmington, Delaware, before entering the Augustinian novitiate at Ghent, Belgium. He was ordained to the priesthood on 24 October 1868 by Bishop Shanahan in the Philadelphia Cathedral.

 

Joseph A. Coleman, O.S.A. (1842-1902) Twelfth President of Villanova College 1880-1886

Rev. Joseph A. Coleman, O.S.A., was a native of Ireland. He did his early studies with the Augustinian Fathers in his native land, completing his education for the priesthood at Ghent, Belgium. Very Rev. John J. Fedigan, O.S.A., was his classmate. After his ordination he returned to Ireland and was for a time prior at St. Augustine's and St. John's churches, Dublin. In 1875 he came to America and was engaged in mission work for two years, and then returned to his native land. He came back to America and became affiliated with the American province. At St. Augustine's parish, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he served for about three years, he reorganized the Sacred Heart Society, succeeding so well that its membership under his direction approached nearly one thousand

 

Francis Michael Sheeran, O.S.A. (1840-1912) Thirteenth President of Villanova College 1886-1890

Father Francis Michael Sheeran was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, in 1840. He received his high school education in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and came to Villanova in 1857. In 1858, with Father Thomas Cooke Middleton, he entered the Augustinian novitiate at Tolentine, Italy, and was ordained to the priesthood in Rome, in 1863.

 

Christopher Augustine McEvoy, O.S.A.(1840-1914) Fourteenth President 1890-1894

Father Christopher McEvoy was born in Queens County, Ireland, in 1840. Before coming to Villanova College in 1866, he attended Notre Dame University and Niagara College. In 1868 he entered the novitiate at Villanova, Pennsylvania, and was ordained to the priesthood by Bishop James F. Wood in 1871.

 

 

Francis J. McShane, O.S.A. (1846-1932) Fifteenth President 1894-1895

Father Francis McShane was born in Aughnocloy, Ireland, in 1846. When he first came to the United States, he lived with the Brothers of the Holy Cross in South Bend, Indiana. In 1868, he entered the Augustinian novitiate at Villanova, Pennsylvania, and was ordained a priest by Bishop James F. Wood in 1872.

 

Many of the Presidents that followed at Villanova had Irish roots.

 

CHESTER'S CENTURY OF CATHOLICISM
1842 -1942

By
REV. JOSEPH M. O'HARA, PH. D.
PASTOR OF OLD ST. MICHAEL'S, CHESTER, PENNSYLVANIA

 

 

 

 

Diocese of Harrisburg

Diocesan History of Harrisburg

 

A Brief History of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia

 

Archdiocese of Philadelphia

 

Diocese of Scranton

 

 

Bishop John Hughes of New York

Fourth bishop and first Archbishop of New York, born at Annaloghan, Co. Tyrone, Ireland, 24 June, 1797 of Patrick Hughes and Margaret McKenna: died in New York, 3 January, 1864. His father, a farmer of limited means, emigrated to the United States in 1816, and settled in Chambersberg, Pa.

 

Ordained to the priesthood 15 October, 1826, by Bishop Conwell, in St. Joseph's Church, Philadelphia, he laboured first at St. Augustine's, Philadelphia, later at Bedford, Pa., finally returning to Philadelphia to become pastor of St. Joseph's, and afterwards of St. Mary's whose trustees were in open revolt against the bishop, and were subdued by Father Hughes only when he built St. Joseph's church, 1832, then considered one of the finest in the country. Previous to this, in 1829, he founded St. John's Orphan Asylum.

 

His name was mentioned for the vacant see of Cincinnati and for the Coadjutorship of Philadelphia. On 7 Jan, 1838, however, Father Hughes was consecrated Bishop of Basileopolis and Coadjutor of New York, by Bishop Dubois, in St. Patrick's Cathedral, Mott Street, New York. In 1839 he became administrator-Apostolic of New York, and on the death of Bishop Dubois succeeded to the vacant see, 20 Dec. 1842. He was raised to the dignity of first Archbishop of New York, 19 July, 1850, receiving the pallium personally from Pius IX at Rome, 3 April 1851.

 

Source: http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/07516a.htm

 

Bishop Richard Phelan

Bishop of Pittsburgh

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

1 Jan 1828

 

Born

Ballyragget, Ireland

4 May 1854

26.3

Ordained Priest

Priest of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

15 May 1885

57.4

Appointed

Coadjutor Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

15 May 1885

57.4

Appointed

Titular Bishop of Cibyra

2 Aug 1885

57.6

Ordained Bishop

Titular Bishop of Cibyra

7 Dec 1889

61.9

Succeeded

Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

20 Dec 1904

77.0

Died

Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bphelan.html

 

Bishop John Tuigg

Bishop of Pittsburgh

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

19 Feb 1821

 

Born

Donoughmore, Ireland

14 May 1850

29.2

Ordained Priest

Priest of Altoona, Pennsylvania, USA

16 Jan 1876

54.9

Appointed

Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

19 Mar 1876

55.1

Ordained Bishop

Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

1877

55.9

Secondarily Appointed

Apostolic Administrator of Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA

7 Dec 1889

68.8

Died

Bishop of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/btuigg.html

 

Bishop John Edmund Fitzmaurice †

Bishop of Erie

 

Date

Age

Event

Title

8 Jan 1839

 

Born

Moyvane, Newtownsandes, Ireland

21 Dec 1862

24.0

Ordained Priest

Priest of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

14 Dec 1897

58.9

Appointed

Coadjutor Bishop of Erie, Pennsylvania, USA

14 Dec 1897

58.9

Appointed

Titular Bishop of Amisus

24 Feb 1898

59.1

Ordained Bishop

Titular Bishop of Amisus

15 Sep 1899

60.7

Succeeded

Bishop of Erie, Pennsylvania, USA

18 Jun 1920

81.4

Died

Bishop of Erie, Pennsylvania, USA

 

Source: http://www.catholic-hierarchy.org/bishop/bfitzj.html

 

 

Research Guide for Catholic Resources (web sites)

 

Philadelphia Catholic League